Until These Voices Quiet, a novel

A state trooper blazes along undulating mountain roads after a speeder refuses to pull over. Something is not right. Something is in the air. A series of increasingly bizarre events precipitate the destabilization of the entire region. Phones stop working. Digital signals are lost. An ancient language breathes in the evergreens, soughing through the pines: Asinîya mihkâwa. The rocks are red.

Outside of the small town of Red Rock Falls, Sheriff’s Deputy Aletha Pruitt arrives at a farm house. She has Tom Blackburn, a young Native American man, in custody. The Morgan workhorses are kicking up a fuss in the barn. Her FTO, a grizzled cop named Bickford, gets out to investigate a suicide call when something comes rushing around the farm house at him. In the commotion, Blackburn escapes.

Until These Voices Quiet features a ensemble of characters, many of them transplants to the region. The Stender family is from New Jersey, as are the two sisters who go missing in the woods after a wedding goes drastically wrong, and a drunken groom skulks off into the night. What is happening? Each of our heroes – the young, unstable Raymond Stender, the rookie deputy Aletha and a host of others carry restless demons. Has something come to collect the markers of their pasts? Is it something more, too? Something to do with Blackburn’s father, who, a transplant himself, once boarded at the old farm house? It’s this very farm house where these people find themselves converging… fighting to stay alive.

Until These Voices Quiet is a twisting, turning adventure in a post-apocalyptic atmosphere. Think you know what’s going on? Think again – the story moves ever onward, unveiling the histories of the heroes one chapter at a time, uncovering the source of the spell which grips them all one whisper at a time. Asinîya mihkâwa. The rocks are red. Indeed they are, and more blood will spill before the nightmare is over.

“I can’t put the book down. So good.” – Kate Zogby, Keene, NY

check out more at the new site – BREARTON BOOKS !

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Until These Voices Quiet starts with a bang. A state trooper blazes along undulating mountain roads after a speeder refuses to pull over. Something is not right. Something is in the air. A series of increasingly bizarre events precipitate the destabilization of the entire region. Phones stop working. Digital signals are lost. An ancient language breathes in the evergreens, soughing through the pines: Asinîya mihkâwa. The rocks are red.

Outside of the small town of Red Rock Falls, Sheriff’s Deputy Aletha Pruitt arrives at a farm house. She has Tom Blackburn, a young Native American man, in custody. The Morgan workhorses are kicking up a fuss in the barn. Her FTO, a grisled cop named Bickford, gets out to investigate a suicide call when something comes rushing around the farm house at him. In the commotion, Blackburn escapes.

Until These Voices Quiet features a group of characters, many of them transplants to the region. The Stender family is from New Jersey, as are the two sisters who go missing in the woods after a wedding goes drastically wrong, and a drunken groom skulks off into the night. What is happening? Each of our heroes – the young, unstable Raymond Stender, the rookie deputy Aletha and a host of others carry restless demons. Has something come to collect the markers of their pasts? Is it something more, too? Something to do with Blackburn’s father, who, a transplant himself, once boarded at the old farm house where these people find themselves converging, fighting to stay alive?

Until These Voices Quiet is a twisting, turning adventure in a post-apocalyptic atmosphere. Think you know what’s going on? Think again – the story moves ever onward, unveiling the histories of the heroes one chapter at a time, uncovering the source of the spell which grips them all one whisper at a time. Asinîya mihkâwa. The rocks are red. Indeed they are, and more blood will spill before the nightmare is over. In order to understand what is happening around them, each hero must understand what is happening within themselves.

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are we there yet?

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Ride The Divide, the award-winning feature-length documentary about the world’s toughest mountain bike race, will make a stop in the north country on Sunday, October 24 at the Palace Theater in Lake Placid. The film chronicles the story of several mountain bikers who attempt the 2,711-mile race named the Tour Divide along the Continental Divide in the Rocky Mountains. The movie was named the Best Adventure Film at this year’s Vail Film Festival.
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This film has become an instant classic among mountain bike riders, and made its television premiere on Wednesday, September 22, on the Documentary Channel. But the Adventure Cycling Association said the film should be seen on the big screen: “The cinematography is stunning!” The bike-enthusiast website UpaDowna added, “Ride The Divide is one of the most inspiring real cycling movies … in a long time.”
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Ride The Divide embraces the inspiring stories of three of the racers who experience the immense mountain beauty and small-town culture as they attempt to pedal from Banff, Canada, to a small, dusty crossing on the Mexican border. There’s Mike (pictured above), a 40-year-old family man who uses this challenge to chart a new course in life; Matthew, a leader in extreme endurance racing who’s competing for his fifth time; and Mary, the first female rider to race this route. As they set out, they will attempt to accomplish what very few have been able to. Over the course of a few weeks, they’ll attempt to climb over 200,000 vertical feet along the backbone of the Rocky Mountains.
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They’ll experience mental breakdowns, treacherous snow, hellacious blisters, and total fatigue. Above all, they’ll race with no support – at times in total isolation. The tests of endurance and the accomplished moments throughout Ride the Divide prompt us to reflect on our inner desires to live life to the fullest.
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Ride The Divide made its debut at the Vail Film Festival and was named the best adventure film at the event. Outside Magazine proclaimed that “(t)he toughest bike race in the world is not in France,” after reviewing the film.
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Ride The Divide will be shown Sunday, October 24th, 7:30 p.m. at the Palace in Lake Placid. Tickets are $10 at the door. This event is presented by the Adirondack Film Society, hosts of the annual Lake Placid Film Forum, and sponsored by High Peaks Cyclery and Placid Planet.

six degrees of separation, catcher in the rye

scene from six degrees of separation, written by john guare

PAUL:   one of the great tragedies of our time (is) the death of the imagination.  because what else is paralysis?  the imagination has been so debased that “imagination”… “being imaginative”… rather than being a linchpin of our existence now stands as a synonym for something outside ourselves.  like science fiction, or some new use for tangerines on raw pork chops.  “what an imaginative summer recipe!!”  and star wars – “so imaginiative!”  and lord of the rings – “all those dwarves, so imaginative!”

the imagination has moved out of the realm of being our link, our most personal link with our inner lives, the world outside that world, this world we share.  what is schizophrenia but a horrifying state where what’s in here doesn’t match up with what’s out there?  why has imagination become a synonym for “style?”

i believe that imagination is the passport that we create to help take us into the real world.  i believe that imagination is another phrase for what is most uniquely us.

jung says, “the greatest sin is to be unconscious.”  holden (caulfield) says, “what scares me is the other guy’s face.  it wouldn’t be so bad if you both could be blindfolded.”  most of the time the faces that we face are not the other guy’s, but our own faces.  and it is the worst kind of yellowness to be so scared of yourself that you put blindfolds on rather than deal with yourself.

to face ourselves.  that’s the hard thing.  the imagination – that’s God’s gift.  to make the act of self-examination bearable.